Welcome to Jan Green's website!


Here you will learn all about her birth and early life in her beloved East Africa, her experiences in Zambia and South Africa, and her relocation to the United Kingdom. Discover how her gift for writing has surfaced... read some excerpts from her books, and find out what is coming next from her fertile mind!


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Jan E. Green

Kate drove her hire car at snail’s pace down the dusty track, bumping over the crunchy coral bones that ridged on the surface of the narrow road, and she turned up a lane that was marked with the sign ‘Bougain Villa’. With every metre she covered her heart seemed to pump faster and faster. She had searched for so long that she had almost despaired that she would ever find what she was seeking. But now after months of research and a trip half way around the world to Kilifi in Kenya, East Africa, she was sure that she was on the threshold of finding the person that she had sought for so long.

 

Jan E. Green

The man in my arms was the most important person in my life. Right from the time that I first met him when I was still very young, there had been a spark between us – a connection that had never been completely broken. It was there all through the years when he was seeking adventure in other parts of Africa – it was there when his life took a turn that excluded me completely, and it had lain dormant until the time was right for it to ignite once again. It seemed to me that too many years had passed while he was away striving to accomplish his dreams – the dreams of a man who craved action, danger and adventure. His quest for adventure had, for so many years, seemed to draw us further and further apart, but now, at last, the man I loved so much was in my arms.

 

Jan E. Green

It was one of those very rare days in England when the weather was decidedly un-British. The unusual pressure system that swirled over the British Isles that early summer’s day drew in hot moist air all the way from Africa, causing the sun’s rays to become magnified as they filtered through the moisture laden atmosphere. It was so different from the normal British sunshine that would usually seep over a cool bracing dawn and highlight the countryside in fingers of bright warmth. This heat was humid and heavy, it felt like hot syrup and I could feel my arms prickling as the fierce rays burned into the exposed skin. The sky was a steely blue, but to the east there was a huge build-up of cumulonimbus clouds under which the sky was almost black. Ominous growls of distant thunder rumbled every now and again.

 

Jan E. Green

As Josh hurried down the passage away from the dentists’ rooms and towards the lifts he felt a sense of relief. Although he was now a confident young adult he still disliked going to the dentist for check-ups. He hated the feeling of vulnerability as the dentist tipped the chair back so that he was lying almost horizontal. It made Josh feel at the mercy of the dentist and his middle-aged assistant who hovered over him with their instruments of torture in their hands. He detested the sharp things that were poked around his teeth and gums and the shriek of the drill set his nerves on edge, while the sight of the dentist coming towards him with a syringe in his hand made Josh feel very apprehensive.

Jan E. Green

My mother had died just a few days after I had been born. Her death was caused by a blood clot that travelled from her leg up to her lung – she had been unaware that there was a problem at all, so when she died it was a dreadful shock to Dad because it was so unexpected. Zam was two years old at the time so neither of us could remember her at all, but we knew what she had looked like as Dad had hung a picture of her on the wall. It was in colour and showed a dainty, dark haired lady who had delicate features and was wearing bellbottomed jeans and a psychedelic peasant blouse. Her feet were bare and she was wearing no makeup but she had weaved white daisies into her dark hair. She held a guitar in her hands and I thought she was very beautiful and wished I could remember her. Her name was Jayne and Dad’s name was Tom, so their names were pretty ordinary.